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Outlandish - Dogan Mehmet with the Boombox Karavan - 'An original and infectious talent' Evening Standard

Outlandish - Dogan Mehmet


with the Boombox Karavan - 'An original and infectious talent' Evening Standard

Item ID: GM02013D   Model No: HOBCD1013   
    Product Features
  • Anglo Turkish folk-punk-trad songs and tunes
    Product Specifications
  • Made in: United Kingdom
  • Model Number: HOBCD1013
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TRACK LIST

1 Lord Bateman
2 Domates Piber Patlican
3 Cut this Cloth
4 üsküdar
5 Aziziye & Susta "slight return"
6 Journey Man
7 Miles Weatherhill
8 Bonny Boy
9 Rakish Young Fellow
10 Young Edwin
11Leymosun Türküsü


REVIEWS

LONDON EVENING STANDARD Friday 17 August 2012
Outlandish (Hobgoblin) ****
Dogan Mehmet is one of Britain’s most intriguing folk musicians drawing on his dual Turkish and English heritage. Outlandish, his second album, begins with Lord Bateman, what might be a signature track which Mehmet describes as Anglo Ottoman funk. Infused with rippling kanun and oriental violin, it is based on an English ballad about a forbidden English Turkish love affair. Cut this Cloth is a powerful original song about the warp and weft of ethnic identity – “you see the world is full of many colours” –anthemic in flavour. He’s backed by the eight-strong Boombox Karavan, a versatile band with guitars, violin, accordion and percussion that ranges from folk rock to nimble Cypriot dance tunes. Dogan Mehmet has an original and infectious talent.
SIMON BROUGHTON



R2 MAGAZINE October 2012
'Outlandish' ****
You have to admire Dogan Mehmet's insouciance in opening his second album with 'Lord Bateman'. After all, the villain of the piece is a Turkish lord with a singular line in execution techniques even though his daughter is the
heroine. The song is performed in Dogan's unique style with his vocals channelling Rory McLeod, with his band, now renamed The Boombox Karavan, given free rein, and it introduces a mostly traditional set of music and songs from
Turkey, Cyprus and Britain. The ideas always stay one step ahead of the listener so 'Domates Biber Patlican', a song by Baris Manco, is given an English translation as a rap by Freddie Phethean. Later, 'Roaming Journey Man' is sung in what might be called an English style but has the Cypriot dance tune 'Sarhos Zeybek' embedded within it. Later still, Dogan delivers a dramatic unaccompanied performance of 'Miles Weatherhill' - and what he does with 'Bonny Boy' I'll leave you to discover for yourselves!
I like Dogan's first album but 'Outlandish' feels like a huge step forward. It's confident, sometimes brash and everything you want from the next generation of singers. The only disappointment was finding out that 'Uskudar' isn't Turkish for whisky.
Dai Jeffries



ENGLISH DANCE & SONG magazine (Autumn 2012)
I won't be alone in remembering the night in 2008 when Dogan Mehmet first introduced himself to the world - or rather, dispensed with the polite handshake and instead grabbed us by the proverbials. The Young Folk Awards had never - and has never again - heard anything like it. With his magenetic stage presence - which leaps straight from the footlights onto record without losing any of its immediacy - this Brighton-born, second generation Turkish-Cypriot delivers his unique 'Anglo-Turkish, Gypsy-Punk style mix' on his second album. Not afraid to gallop along with ragged raucousness, as with 'Roaming Jouney Man' and 'Rakish Young Fellow', Dogan also needs no rocky ensemble to deliver drama, demonstrated on the a capella 'Miles Weatherhill' and the album's three Turkish songs. I would politely suggest that you haven't heard anything until you've experienced the 'deep South Gospel' rendition of 'Bonny Boy' replete with bluesy falsetto ... my oh my, I suspect that even Peter Bellamy himself would have raised his eyebrows at this (before sitting back and enjoying it). The 'Ango-Ottoman funk' rendition of 'Lord Bateman' sounds so right - a British ballad finally reunited with Turkey. It is possible that some moments are a little hammed-up, but that's all part of the carnivalesque boisterousness of it all. This man is, to quote that song, 'young but growing', and I for one will follow his future career with a gleeful eye and ready ear. Dogan's sound is truly original - it can't be faked because it emanates from a passionate blend of cultural roots. In this way, it is truly what English traditional music should sound like - as exotic as its actual demographic and yet wholly rooted. Outlandish indeed !
Clare Button



TRACK LISTING

Lord Bateman- 4:00
Domates Biber Patlican- 4:00
Cut This Cloth- 4:00
Uskudar- 4:00
Azziye/ Susta Slight Return- 4:00
Roaming Journey Man- 4:00
Miles Weatherhill- 4:00
Bonny Boy- 4:00
Rakish Young Fellow- 4:00
Young Edwin- 4:00
Leymosun Turkusu- 4:00

SLEEVE NOTES
Lord Bateman- this is one of my Favorite stories/ballads within the English tradition; the forbidden love between a Turkish Sultan’s daughter and English Royalty. I feel there will many more versions of this song to come from me in future albums. For now I leave you in hands of the sound I like to call Anglo Ottoman Funk.

Domates Biber Patlican- a song from the amazing Baris Manco telling the story of a young man’s unrequited love for his childhood sweetheart. This is what happened when he choose to reveal his deep secret in a public place he was interrupted but a market stall sales man calling “ Domates Biber Patlican…… Tomatoes Peppers Aubergines” as a result he never seems to let out what he wanted to say. The outcome of the story is left untold. This song features a beautiful re-telling of the story from the fantastic rapping talents of wordsmith “Drop Dead Fred”. I’d like to dedicate this to my sister Hayriye Mehmet (featured on backing vocals) for making me listen to Baris Manco as much as we did when we were growing up, he has been a big inspiration to me.

Cut This Cloth- this is my last teenage outburst in musical form, as I enter my twenties I find there is nothing I dislike more in life then filling out forms, but the most irritating are those that ask for your ethnic origin. Like many people in the UK today my heritage is mixed and like my music has many influences. I never know what to tick. So I end up ticking the box entitled “Other”. This is dedicated to all those who like me are “Others”. Remember we are all Cut from the same cloth… no matter where you’re from we are all cut from the same cloth.

Uskudar- Here I present to you the worlds oldest recorded Turkish Folk song a song spanning many generations this is a song that was sung to me by my mother and grandfather as lullaby. Even though this is a story very much in an English folk ballad style this is a young Turkish man going out a roving one day when on the way to Uskudar the heavens opened. I’d like to dedicate this to my Grandfather, and my cousin Jem’s Grandfather they were best friends and both sang this to me as a baby.

Azziye & Susta (Slight Return)- this is a set of tunes from the Cypriot folk dance repertoire. This tune is played for a female dance with wooden spoons named after the tune title Azziye. Versions of this tune can be found in many places including the Art music traditions of Turkey and Ottoman Court music Repertoire. The final section of this tune is a reprise of a tune featured on my first Album Gypsyhead the tune Susta here I play the final 2 parts of the tune I left off album 1. I’d like to draw you attention to our fantastic special guest John Pope on double bass and congratulate him on his first outing playing Turkish Gypsy Jazz.

Roaming Journey man/ Sarhos Zeybek- this is a great story of a young man who loves to travel the United Kingdom with his violin meeting new friends along the way. It comes from a long family of beggar man / wild rover songs. This is my creation adapted from the singing of Tom Willet of Sussex from the Kennedy Gypsy singers Recordings. Half way through my cousin Cem and I choose to take you on one of these journeys musically; introducing you to the Traditional Cypriot dance Tune Sarhos Zeybeck a piece common to both north and south sides of the Island. This track features my good friend and current tutor James Fagan on backing vocals.

Miles Weatherhill- a song first introduced to me by James Fagan, this song encouraged me to listen to the entire back catalogue of the much-loved Nick Jones. I love the passion for young love displayed in this song and the fact that for me, this is the best example of juicy Broadside ballad.

Bonny Boy- the story of a young man who loses his life far too soon and we never seem to find out why. This was a big experiment since I heard Dan Quinn and Will Duke sing this in there major version I could only ever hear it as a deep south Gospel track or with a film score behind it. With a little help from my friends and 70% dark coco chocolate I managed to realize it. Special thanks to Natalie Fisher on Vocals, Dan Walsh on Banjo, Seth Tinsley on Double Bass, Rachel Hales on viola and Max Gilkes on Hammond Organ. This could of only been possible with them.

Rakish Young Fellow- A song of reflection. This gentleman was young, wild and reckless and now he stops to look back, also to look ahead at a quieter more settled life away from the seven seas. This song features my favorite lyric from within any English folk song; it is poetical, well thought out and was one of the selling points for choosing to share this song with you on this album.
“ And when I am dead and I am buried for that is the end of my life I’ll never go sobbing or sighing I’ll do a good turn for my wife I’ll never go sobbing or sighing but there’s one last favour I crave wrap me in my tarpaulin Jacket and fiddle and dance around my grave.”
This is from the singing of Walter Pardon a man I have many great songs from. I hope to continue my quest to remix his entire catalogue before I die.
This song features the tune “twice nightly” written by the entire band a first. It was a great experience seven passionate people in a room sharing ideas, after some time this was the result. Well done lads. I presented this tune to the gentleman who composed two of the tunes featured on our last record, Southover and De monfets stand, both written by Glen Redman (yes our bass players father) for Brighton Morris Men with dances, so this time we took the opportunity to give something back to his morris tradition by giving him a tune for him to write the dance to. The result was reliving the days of Albion Morris by featuring the sound of morris dancing on this track. That’s right Ladies and Gentlemen please welcome in our rhythm section for this tune Brighton Morris Men on Bells and Sticks.

Young Edwin- an English Folk song I took from the Penguin Book of English Folk songs back in early 2003 when I started to really get into the English folk tradition. This song has suck in my brain and followed me into pretty much every line-up I have ever been in. This particular version we refer to as the Big Band version the Deerhunters have at least 3 versions of this song so watch-out the next record maybe have the other version on it.

Leymosun Turkusu- the traditional anthem of the Village of Lemasoil. My mother’s birth place, and a beautiful village in southern Cyprus. This is a great story of young love. A young man finally admits he’s been a bit rakish and after admitting his faults announces to his lover that by the summer they will be wed. I’d like to dedicate this one to my mother Gulbin Remzi for all her encouragement, positive influence and lovely cooking.

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Hobgoblin Records was set up in 2005 with the aim of releasing albums from British based artists of all cultures playing all types of folk and traditional music. We've released 15 albums so far with several more in the pipeline. Shipping is free for the CDs on this page!
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Hobgoblin Records: Acoustic roots music from British artists, from Jazz to Latin to Folk and beyond   View all Hobgoblin Records Recordings   View all Hobgoblin Records Products

Hobgoblin Records was set up in 2005 with the aim of releasing albums from British based artists of all cultures playing all types of folk and traditional music. We've released 15 albums so far with several more in the pipeline. Shipping is free for the CDs on this page!